Smart homes are meant to simplify your life and increase your home security. Unfortunately, if not implemented properly, smart home devices can end up sharing too much of your information. Keep your home safe from hackers with these smart strategies.

 

 

 

Keep It Simple
Investing in all the newest smart devices is enticing, but when it comes down to it, less is more. Think about it – the more devices you install, the more chances hackers have to target your home.

Carefully consider what you really need. Choose the devices that will have the most meaningful impact on your daily life in a positive way. That way you get the most value for your investment while limiting your digital entry points.

Know Your Weak Points
Although hackers can be a nuisance, they also help to make smart homes safer. They allow manufacturers to address weaknesses and vulnerabilities, thus enhancing smart home devices. In addition, there is security software that you can purchase and install to add an extra layer of protection to your system and devices.

Think Analog, But Better
As research suggests, a home that appears occupied is less of an easy target than one that appears empty. When you leave for vacation, you may leave a light on or enlist timers to make it appear as if someone is home, but smart light bulbs can handle the work for you.

Smart light bulbs are easier to use than traditional timers, allowing you to control them remotely and offering other useful features. Depending on the one you choose, features can include smart sensors which will activate in response to open doors or doorbells. This can act as an effective deterrent to burglars.

Don’t Forget The Basics
Despite employing smart home devices, basic security measures should not be ignored. Remember to lock your doors and windows, refrain from announcing vacations or getaways on social media, and be sure your internet connection is encrypted and secure. Forgetting these things can leave your home and belongings susceptible to intruders.

In terms of internet connections, without encryption, your smartphone and smart devices are useless. Because these devices require internet connection, without encryption, you are leaving your home open to hackers who may access your system, change your settings and physically and digitally access your home.

As smart homes continue to improve, they will be able to offer more advanced features along with possible machine learning, providing a more personalized smart home experience. And although the future of this technology is promising, it also brings forth more risks. Combing the use of this advanced tech, as well as basic security tools can provide the optimal security solution.

In addition, the need to educate the consumer is crucial. Before investing in these technologies, be sure that you know what potential threats and risks exist and how to combat them.